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How to Care for A Classical Guitar   by Kremona Bulgaria on 27-07-2010 12:06:12
How to care for your Violin, Viola, Cello or Bass   by Kremona Bulgaria on 19-02-2010 14:50:53
 Subject :How to care for your Violin, Viola, Cello or Bass.. 19-02-2010 14:50:53 
Kremona Bulgaria
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Joined: 19-02-2010 13:50:55
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Location: Kazanlak, Bulgaria
 

A stringed instrument requires an extraordinary amount of care and attention. It is composed of materials that are constantly changing, is subject to forces of many killos per square centimeter by the pressure of the strings, and spends much of its life in perpetual vibration. Over the several hundred year life of an instrument in normal use some structural changes will inevitably happen.


 

Here are several things you can do to ease your instrument's life with you.

 

  • TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY:

Changes in temperature and humidity wreak havoc on a stringed instrument. Avoid any sudden change. Keep the instrument away from direct sunlight. If the case is cold, wait at least 15 minutes before opening it. In general, avoid any and all extremes in temperature and humidity. 35-60% relative humidity should be sufficient.

-    Do not store the instrument near radiators or heat vents.

-    Never let rosin build up on top or underneath the strings. Clean the rosin off before you put the instrument away.

 

  • CRACKS AND OPENINGS:

Despite your best efforts, cracks sometimes develop and/or the top or back pull away from the ribs. Bring your instrument in for repair as soon as possible. Neglecting cracks and openings can lead to far more serious problems.

 

  • CHECK YOUR BRIDGE AND STRAIGHTEN IT OFTEN!

The side of the bridge facing the tailpiece should be perpendicular to the tangent. (the top of the instrument is curved, the tangent is a straight line that intersects only one point (where the bridge rests) on that curve). Tuning the strings generally pulls the bridge towards the fingerboard. If the bridge moves off the perpendicular it will warp, and shortly there after it will break. Check to make sure the bridge is perpendicular to the tangent of the arch at that point at least twice per week.

-  Lubricate the string grooves in the bridge by rubbing a soft pencil in the grooves, as this will decrease the amount of friction, and therefore minimize bridge displacement.

 

  • SOUND-POST:

The sound-post is the small dowel of wood inside the violin near the treble foot of the bridge. The sound-post controls most of your instruments sound quality, balance, and projection. If your instrument is having trouble in these areas, it is probable that they would be eliminated with a sound-post adjustment.

 

  • FINGERBOARD AND NUT:

Lubricate the nut grooves in the same way as the bridge is lubricated. Fingerboards develop bumps and grooves from string and finger wear. If the strings wear far into the nut, the open strings will buzz, at which point we will replace the nut.

 

  • STRINGS:

Change the strings at least once per year.

 

  • PEGS:

Warm humid weather will make pegs sticky. Lubricate the pegs with a special compound. Dry, cold weather will make pegs slip. Use blackboard chalk to make the pegs hold firmer.

 


 

TAKE CARE FOR YOUR BOWED INSTRUMENT, SO IT SOUNDS GREAT FOR MANY YEARS!

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Last Edited On: 27-07-2010 12:06:40 By Kremona Bulgaria for the Reason
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